Archive for December 16th, 2010

16
Dec
10

Digital / Analog Procedural Sandbox Region Witchcraft – part 4

So for my Ouija-board-esque method of sandbox mapping, I had made a hex-grid of my chosen region and I applied the nebulous hues of the terrain with a kid’s watercolor kit. I now needed to provide more details for adventuring like roads, rivers, villages, mountains, hills etc. The first step was to go straight to my Judges Guild encounters that I rolled up using my junky little python script. It gave me a final printout with about 150 different villages, castles, ruins, and layers listed by hex coordinates that I could place right away without looking at the underlying terrain colors. I did not have details of all the encounters. The lairs and ruins could be rolled up later, but the castles and villages were really important in that they had an alignment and a race associated with each listed encounter.

I printed up my freshly hexed map on my inkjet printer (photo matte paper is great) and then clipped a piece of clear transparency to it, like the clear plastic you get for overhead projectors. With the transparency I could write and sketch in the details with a permanent marker and then I could scan it in again for whatever reason. I went down the hex columns on the map and looked for the proper coordinates for each of the encounters on the programmed list and marked a V, C, L, or R in a fine point marker. Any encounter that landed in the water would become an Idyllic Isle, but the rest pretty much stayed where the “fell”. (You could also place the letters on the hexes with the image layers of GIMP, but I felt like using my hands for my mapping and locating.)

Evil castles or villages would get a red circle and good villages and castles would get a green circle. Right away, I had clumps of good settlements and clumps of evil settlements that could suggest some type of politics or borders in my small local region. I could start putting in dotted lines to connect the villages and castles with roads and start wondering about how the encounter placement worked in a narrative sense. Why would an evil hobgoblin settlement be right next to a lawful-good human settlement? Maybe there is a siege going on, maybe the Hobgoblins are a large mercenary camp that defends the larger human village. Why are there evil dwarves occupying this castle? This sandbox style of planning is all about divining some type of meaning from what the random results provide. There is always the ability to fudge, but the whole point of the method is to provide a springboard to your interpretations.

So I had a rough idea about what encounters goes where on the region map, and I could continue to flesh out the whole area, naming all the villages, placing all the roads, and placing the definite terrain and rivers all within a hundred or so miles of the characters. But then again, do I really need 150 encounters and surrounding terrain detailed to begin play? I didn’t think so. And besides, one of the key tenets of sandbox play is to structure details around what the players start to provide. We needed to leave room for the screwed up village that one of the PCs originates from.

With this in mind, I decided to zoom in even more, and save the fiddling for a tighter focus map, something I would imagine as being a good “home-base” area like The Keep On The Borderlands or something of that nature. It was time to start drawing in map symbols and naming stuff in a small locality…

Continued to part 5…




Past Adventures of the Mule

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